Welcome to Filbert Acres! Our family farm grows fantastic nutrient dense foods: microgreens and hazelnuts. Our microgreens are sold to fine restaurants and vendors in and around Puyallup.  Our hazelnuts are grown in our beautiful valley soil, harvested each fall, and sold from the farm and at Proctor Farmer's Market.

We're open Saturdays October through December, and by appointment.

Latest News...

OPEN --LAST 2013 Saturday!

We will be open again tomorrow, Saturday, from  8:00 to 2:00. 
 

CLOSED SATURDAY DECEMBER 21

Sorry for any incovenience--we are closed today but will be open again every Saturday 8:00 to 2:00. 
 

Thanksgiving Special--Extended Hours

Filbert Acres Signature Pork is on special--10% off all orders of $100 or more; 15% off $150 or more!

Also, in addition to today (Saturday 8:00 to 4:00) We will be open next week, Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday 2:00 to 6:00pm

Other treats to stock up on?  Carrots, Winter Squash, Pie Pumpkins, and more!

Halve-some Wholesome Pork

This is your last chance to get a half or whole hog from Filbert Acres in 2013!

"We couldn't be any more pleased," said one August customer of a half.  He went on to say, as several have said, that he would love to promote our pork by giving away a chop or two, but he's finding himself uncharacteristically selfish on that score. . .

Hog Heaven @ Filbert Acres

Raising animals well, means respecting an animal's nature. Warehouses are not the right place for any animal, least of all an intelligent playful creature like a pig. We're committed to providing quality meat through quality animal husbandry. To us, that means organic feed and a regular pasture rotation that allows the pigs to run, wallow, eat pasture, dig, and avoid their own poo.  This batch has been finish on hundred of pounds of apples and hazelnuts!

Is it Expensive?

Factory-farmed pork may seem cheap, but the costs are hidden. Some costs are externalized: farmers trapped in debt, farm workers in dangerous health conditions, pigs suffering in confinement, super-germs created by sub-therapeutic antibiotics, environmental issues with concentrated effluent. Other costs are found right in the factory pork and transferred to the consumer: lower quality, residual hormones, unknown effects of GMOs, reduced Omega-3 and unquantified effects on consumer health.

This batch has an exceptional variety of weights--you can choose smaller or larger halves or wholes.  (Halves available:  77lb, 95lb, 112lb)  (Wholes available: 147lb, 189lb, 238lb).  Email us for availability, pricing, and logistics.

Not sure if you want to buy a half or whole?  Come by Saturday and buy a pork chop to remove all doubts!

"The Best Conditioner"

"Exercise and sunshine are assured when the growings, brood sows, and pigs are on pasture.  Pasture is the best source of vitamins and is the best conditioner"   --Profitable Pig Production, Kansas State College of Agriculture and Applied Science, May 1935

Was Kansas State College of Ag. wrong? 

Well come taste for yourself and be the judge!  Our freezers are well-stocked once again and we are eager for you to enjoy Puyallup produced pork!  We really stocked up on ground pork because it has nothing added and is so versatile.  You can customize your own sausage by adding seasonings or herbs from your own garden (or ours); you can make meatloaf, burgers, casseroles, tacos, meatballs, stuffed peppers, and more.   To help inspire you to try ground pork we are discounting it to $7.00/lb through next Saturday (limit 2 at this price).  We're open Saturdays from 8:00 to 2:00

We are also taking deposits now ($100)  for wholes/halves for our October batch of hogs.  Hurry to reserve now by check or credit card!  Email us for more information on how this works.

Transparent Quality Pork -- Whole/Half on sale now

Some neighbors up the hill seemed happy to have the boys and I clean up the fallen apples beneath their ancient trees--we probably picked up 1000lb in 40 minutes, mostly early transparent apples.  A few minutes later we were feeding them to the hogs, who seemed to appreciate them to a similar degree as they do the hazelnuts in their finishing rations.  These hogs are getting ready to go, so we're looking for a few good freezers that need to be stocked up with wholesome pastured pork.  Please email for details about purchasing a whole/half, and we'll explain the cost, the procedures, and logistics.  A couple of shelves in the freezer could be enough for a half--let us know soon, before we sell out.

Boneless Netted Leg Roasts SALE

We have some really nice boneless netted leg roasts that are now $14/pound (they were $16/lb).  Come by Saturday for all sorts of cuts of pork, for delicious strawberries, for a wonderful array of fresh-picked vegetables straight from the farm!  Come watch the pumpkins grow!  Beautiful dahlias cut fresh on Saturday.  We'll be open tomorrow 8:00 to 2:00.

 

We Take Plastic

It has been a long time coming, but we finally take credit and debit.  The Square, which work from our cell phone, has been working well for about two weeks now. 

Winter Squash are Planted--tell us your favorites!

Pictured here is one of our favorite--Australian Butter.   Most of the little three and four leaf winter squash plants are in and soon they will be pumping up with sweetness and vitamin A. 

Come by Saturday for snow peas, sugar snap peas, arugula, salad, strawberries, and all manner of pork tastiness.  We're open 8:00-2:00 every Saturday.

What are your favorites for eating?  for soup?  for pie?  (not that we can do much about it for this year. . .)

If You Eat, Please Try Cooking

Yesterday I spent much of the day driving around with a van full of frozen pork (hint: you might want to come by on Saturday).  Listening to the radio, I heard  an NPR interview of Michael Pollan (The Omnivore's Dilemma) talking about his latest book, Cooked.  The interview is really interesting and, charateristically, Pollan is full of intriguing insights which make a person want to get the book.  Pollan argues that his earlier investigation of our food systems (Omnivore's Dilemma) and his earlier critique of the nutrional dogmas (In Defense of Food) that form our ideas of what is good for us, leaves out a major link:  the transformation of ingredients into the art of food.  Another favorite author (and activist-farmer), Joel Salatin, has been arguing the same point and puts it simply in his latest book:  "Get in the kitchen."

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